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Johannes Holmberg

UI developer & designer

One thing that I've learned over the years is this: The more things you have, the more time it takes to manage. I'm a structural guy, I like to put things in their correct folder and label them as I go. This gives me some kind of inner peace and calms my nerves.

Every little thing you add on to your life will take up on your space. Think of it. Every app you install on your phone, every new social network you register for, every new channel you get on your TV. All of them will ask for your attention and they will take of your time as you manage them.

When management itself becomes bigger than the actual value you get back from the product, you need to stop and think for a while. Imagine living in a big beautiful house of yours but the thing is you can't enjoy your time being there, because every day goes to cleaning instead. You need to question yourself. Is it really worth it? If you struggle to find a good answer, it's time to let go.

Become the master of the few tools you have.

You can never be great at anything if you try to be good at all things. Nothing beats the feeling of being in control. I feel in control over my phone when I know every app on it inside out. I can master them, and they obey my every wish. I could never do this if I had 100+ apps on my phone. That's why I'm keeping them to a minimum.

This doesn't mean that we shouldn't explore though. Exploring is the seed of creativity and it lies within the DNA of the human race. It's important to explore, for sure, but it is as important to realize when things have gone overboard and you just keep on maintaining things for no reason. Just because you've done so in the past doesn't mean it brings value back to you today.

Keep questioning yourself. Why do I use this? Do I really need it? Can I combine, merge or experiment with something new? If you do that you will find yourself with new possibilities and less management.